detailsofpaintings:

Giovanni Boldini, Portrait of Mrs. Howard-Johnston
1906

detailsofpaintings:

Giovanni Boldini, Portrait of Mrs. Howard-Johnston

1906

the-faces-of-art:

ruth p. bobbs, woman in white, ca. 1902-07 (x)

the-faces-of-art:

ruth p. bobbs, woman in white, ca. 1902-07 (x)

archiveofaffinities:

Antoni Gaudi, Project for a Grand Hotel, Elevation, New York, New York, 1909

archiveofaffinities:

Antoni Gaudi, Project for a Grand Hotel, Elevation, New York, New York, 1909

turnofthecentury:

Arlette Dorgere by Reutlinger
thanks to marc verat

turnofthecentury:

Arlette Dorgere by Reutlinger

thanks to marc verat

Actress Lily Elsie (1886-1962).

Actress Lily Elsie (1886-1962).

(Source: julia-loves-bette-davis)

omgthatdress:

Corset
1900
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Molly Bloom.

omgthatdress:

Corset

1900

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Molly Bloom.

Edwardian street photography at The Daily Mail.

(Of course, this being a UK tabloid, the comments are along the lines of “Not a tattoo in sight. Wonderful! When women knew their duty.” Ignore the idiots, enjoy the big hats.)

yeoldefashion:

At first glance this 1905 evening gown designed by Lucile and entitled ‘A Protest’ appears to be just a pretty dress, if not with a slightly unusual name and color combination. The whole truth is far more interesting.
I wrote a while back about the Victorian practice of using different colors or gemstones to spell out messages in jewelry. This dress uses the same practice on a larger scale.
The color combination of (g)reen, (w)hite and (v)iolet would have sent a very specific message to any one in the know.
Specifically: (G)ive (W)omen the (V)ote.
This is a suffragette ball gown!

So great.

yeoldefashion:

At first glance this 1905 evening gown designed by Lucile and entitled ‘A Protest’ appears to be just a pretty dress, if not with a slightly unusual name and color combination. The whole truth is far more interesting.

I wrote a while back about the Victorian practice of using different colors or gemstones to spell out messages in jewelry. This dress uses the same practice on a larger scale.

The color combination of (g)reen, (w)hite and (v)iolet would have sent a very specific message to any one in the know.

Specifically: (G)ive (W)omen the (V)ote.

This is a suffragette ball gown!

So great.